Imprinting

I opened up a Shelfari account and populated it with most of the books I’ve read from 2005 on — I don’t have a list of what I read before then.

It’s quite an easy service to use. Search for your book and edition, then add it to your shelf. Then add in some other metadata about it easily. I have little interest in writing reviews for books because that would take too long — I never wrote reviews on Amazon.com either. I guess I don’t have enough particular experiences from a book (save for the passages I dog-ear that I wish I could digitally copy into my computer or something) to want to write about it.

Contrast this with Yelp, which I just started using to rate and review stores and restaurants in the US. My dining and shopping experiences are very particular and very keyed in to all my senses, whereas a book isn’t. So I’ve felt like writing quite a few reviews on Yelp.

But one thing I noticed at Shelfari was that they show your books from the front cover art. I thought this was dumb at first, since you can’t display as much data quickly as you could if you just had a list of text.

But then I realized that I identify a lot of books purely from the cover art. It irks me in fact to see older cover art, or modified cover art for re-issued books. The cover is as much a part of the book as what’s in it, in terms of identifying it.

When I go abroad to Europe, all the books have different cover art in the bookstores and it really throws me off. It’s like reading in a different language you’re not fluent in — I have to slow down and read each book title instead of glancing at the cover and knowing what it is.

Here’s a quick experiment. Take the paper cover off your hardback books and look at that ugly hard cover that it has underneath. The book’s meaning and feel change completely.

I thought about how this affects experiences in e-books and on the Kindle. Books sort of become faceless through digital readers because you don’t see the cover every time you open the book. It’s just another digital file. Is there some way to replicate the experience through good design?

I then thought about whether music albums have this same imprint. I have not bought an album in ages — I download a lot of my music. So I don’t even really know what the cover art looks like for the music I listen to.

But that doesn’t matter because the personalities I listen to have large media presences and style themselves in flamboyant and stereotypical ways. I know my music through photos and TV. I also know my music through the way a band sounds — you can identify music pretty quickly from the guitarist’s sound or the voice of the lead singer.

Maybe albums need to take a cue from the visual imprinting of a book’s cover art and develop a musical imprint to put on albums and songs and artists.

This is essentially creating a brand appropriate to the media it promotes. Can I brand my web site better? Can I brand “Ben Turner” better?

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Filed under Books, Design, Marketing

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